What's in your products?

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I'm a need to know person myself, Is it safe? Is it vegan? What is Citric Acid? Are any of your products tested on bunnies? To answer some of these, all the ingrediance we use in our products are vegan, safe and as a absolute animal lover I would never use materials tested on animals. Our CSPR (Cosmetic Safety Product Reports) ensure we stick to this, as no products sold in the UK and EU can be tested on animals. Plus, I enjoy testing my products before having them assesed by a cosmetic chemist. Here is a list of what's in our products, you might find your way here from a product page as were trying to be as open as we can about everything that goes into Bubble & BOOM's products.

Sodium Bicarbonate

 

Sodium bicarbonate (sometime called baking soda) is found in a large number of cosmetic products including toothpase and deoderant, it helps the products melt into the water easily.

Description

Sodium bicarbonate (NaHCO3) is an alkaline chemical compound that occurs naturally in a substance called natron. Natron is a natural deposit that forms in salt lake beds. However, most of the global production of sodium bicarbonate is achieved through a method called the "Solvay process" which involves mixing salt, limestone and ammonia. 

Sodium bicarbonate is mainly used in bath bombs, when mixed with citric acid it causes a fizz which helps to diffuse colours and essential oils. It also has a softening effect on hard water.

 

Wiki link here

Citric Acid

 

Citric Acid is mainly used in bath bombs, as above when it reacts with Sodium Bicarbonate it causes a fizzing effect that releases colour and essential oils into the water.

Description

Sodium bicarbonate (NaHCO3) is an alkaline chemical compound that occurs naturally in a substance called natron. Natron is a natural deposit that forms in salt lake beds. However, most of the global production of sodium bicarbonate is achieved through a method called the "Solvay process" which involves mixing salt, limestone and ammonia. 

Sodium bicarbonate is mainly used in bath bombs, when mixed with citric acid it causes a fizz which helps to diffuse colours and essential oils. It also has a softening effect on hard water.

 

Wiki link here

Sodium Lauryl Sulfoacetate​ (SLAa)

 

SLSa is used in all of our bath bombs, it helps to add the bubbles you see on the surface of the water, it is not to be confused with SLS which is much harsher on the skin.

Description

Sodium Lauryl Sulfoacetate (SLSA) has a very similar name to one of the most common sulfate ingredients, Sodium Lauryl Sulfate (SLS), so you may be tempted to avoid it. Both ingredients are surfactants that can create bubbles and lather in cleansers, but that is pretty much where the similarity ends. SLS is a cheaper ingredient made in a lab while SLSA is naturally derived from coconut and palm oils.

Cornflour (Zea Mays)

Description

Cornstarch and cornflour are fine, silken powders milled from the dried seed cobs of corn. Corn is an annual type of grass and tolerates most climates very well. The plant has a long stem, growing up to five feet and flowering in early summer.

Cornstarch is really close to cornflour but they are not exactly the same. Starch originates from the inside of corn seeds and is more thickening than the flour, which is made out of the entire seed. That said, they can both be used for culinary and cosmetic purposes, particularly as a thickener. They absorb excess oil and water more than any other flours, which aids cleansing when used in a cosmetics.

Applied directly on the skin, the powders feel really soft and are often used to replace talc.

 

Rice Bran Oil (Oryza sativa)

Description

Rice bran oil is obtained from the outer layer of the rice kernel (the bran). This light golden oil gives soap a rich, creamy texture, but also has many benefits for the skin. It is excellent for sensitive skins due to its moisturising and exfoliant properties.​​

 

Polysorbate 80

Description

Polysorbate 80 is an emulsifier (binder) that helps the oils and colours in your bath bombs disperse more evenly in the bath water rather than pooling on top. It also prevents the the oils and mica from clinging to the tub and the bather and staining you a lovely bright pink!

 

CI Numbers

Description

Each Dye gets identified by a unique five digit number, which is called CI or colour Index number. Apart from the number the each dye is given a Generic name or CI name, the name is based on the base action, dyes mode of behavior and the action. The CI name thus gives a specific way in which dyes can be identified, if you would like to find out more about a specific colour be sure to search for it online and you'll find lots of helpful information.

Naturally Occuring Allergens

Description

You know when you look at ingredients on skincare and toiletries and you see that bit which doesn’t make any sense to you, “naturally occurring allergens” what on earth does it mean?

This is a really important question when you have sensitive skin, it’s really important to understand what you are using on your skin, and what is natural and what isn’t.

What are allergens?

The main definition of an allergen is something that causes an allergic reaction. Skin can react to natural ingredients and synthetic, lab-made ingredients. If you have sensitive skin, it’s a good idea to pick products that have a short list of allergens.

What are the allergens called?

When making skincare in the correct, legal way, it’s vital to list the allergens that occur in the essential oils that you use; the kind of things you will see listed under naturally occurring allergens are:

Benzyl Alcohol, Benzyl Salicylate, Cinnamyl Alcohol, Cinnamal, Citral, Coumarin, Eugenol, Geraniol, Isoeugenol, Anisyl Alcohol, Benzyl Benzoate, Benzyl Cinnamate, Citronellol, Farnesol, Limonene, Linalool

Virtually all essential oils contain naturally occurring allergens, and if used neat, you are very likely to get some kind of skin reaction; this is why you should only use essential oils if they have been diluted down to only 1 or 2% in a carrier oil or base products. All of my products contain less that 1% essential oils so they are super-safe even on sensitive skins.

If an essential oil contains a lot of allergens, you might be more likely to have a reaction to that, such as ylang ylang, which has quite a long list of allergens.

And it can be confusing that although all of the above naturally occur in essential oils, they can be lab-extracted to make them a separate ingredient.

If you think you do have an allergy to one of these, the only way to be certain is to get patch-testing via a dermatologist. In the short-term, it’s best to use products with very low or no essential oils.

The only products we currently supply that dont contain any alergens is in the scent Marshmellow & Candyfloss